Category: load boards

Staying Flexible while Truck Driving

We all experience it sometimes, stiffness is the bane of the human experience after long spells of sleeping, sitting, or driving. Without constant motion our joints decide that they want to stay in the same position, and this can be an uncomfortable situation. The good news is that even for people in careers that require long spans of stationary work, such as truck drivers, stiffness is still avoidable.

Stretch Like Armstrong

While you won’t always be able to stop and walk around once you feel stiffness coming on, there are plenty of stretches you can do at pick-up and drop-off locations, as well as stops along the way to keep yourself limber for the long drive ahead.. To get the greatest benefit, you must be consistent. Stretching every now and then may be helpful, but the real benefit comes from stretching regularly.

Stretching is something everyone does naturally. Concentrated stretches to loosen up your body include toe touches, swinging your arms in large circles and then small circles, twisting your upper body back and forth, and performing a downward dog and seal stretch if you are able to lay on the ground. There are more stretches online that you can find with a quick google search for all fitness levels and time constraints. 

Exercising isn’t just for Bodybuilders

In addition to promoting your overall health and reducing your risk of injury, exercising regularly can also help you stay flexible. Isaac Newton’s First Law of Motion says that “an object in motion stays in motion.” This is a fact that is applicable far beyond the reach of high school physics classes. Even though driving requires you to stay seated for long periods of time, moving as much as you can during stops and time off is important to maintaining your wellbeing and flexibility, which will translate to more comfortable drives. 

There are many exercise options, for those of all fitness levels, to build their health. Taking a run or walk around the block may be the most viable choice for some, while going to the gym or practicing calisthenics may be beneficial for others. Try different workouts to keep your body and mind engaged and prevent burnout from repeating the same thing constantly.

Fit and Free

Growing older means that you will inevitably become stiffer, but even this age-related stiffening of the joints and muscles can be combated through purposeful motion. The more you move the fewer injuries, pain, and stiffness you will face as you continue enjoying your chosen career. Maintaining a routine of stretching and exercising, whenever possible, will help you stay safer and freer from worry for much longer than simply letting time run its course. 

The most important thing to remember while combating stiffness is that stretching and exercising must be a consistent part of your routine to see any real improvements in your flexibility. The more you move and stretch, the more your body will feel stronger, limber, and ready to tackle anything life throws your way. It’s as simple as taking a walk at your next stop and adding in a few toe touches every day. Then building up to more difficult stretches and workouts as you go. 

What is the Truck Parking bill all about?

Parking is something that all drivers, who transport freight long distances, worry about on a regular basis. While some truck stops offer parking and there are other locations that may be viable, there is a serious shortage of free and convenient parking available for drivers across the nation which poses a serious and sometimes life-threatening dilemma. Should the driver continue driving until they reach a parking area, which is dangerous as they are already fatigued, or should they park in a dangerous or illegal place to get some rest?

Outrage at this dilemma has caused many to speak out in favor of drivers. There has recently been a bipartisan bill introduced in the House of Representatives known as the Truck Parking Safety Improvement Act or H.R.6104. If passed, this bill would mean there would be a national initiative to provide more accessible free parking to drivers across the nation to promote their safety and the safety of everyone else driving on the interstate as well.

An Explanation

So why is the Truck Parking Bill only being considered now? It has been a long needed and awaited amendment to the legislation regarding the infrastructure of the United States, so it seemingly should have arrived sooner. Unfortunately, the legal system can be slow, and it is a lengthy process to get a bill written, sponsored, and presented to the house.  then voting, compromising, and ratifying take an added period of time which varies from bill to bill.

Thankfully, bills that benefit drivers are becoming more prevalent. In fact, there has already been an effort to prevent driver injury through Jason’s Law (named after a driver who was murdered after parking in a dangerous area). The issue with this law is that it does not hold enough power to create a national change.  Therefore, Representatives Mike Bost and Angie Craig (who are on different sides of the political aisle) have sponsored the bill to increase available parking for drivers.

Safety and Security

With the truck driving industry growing larger each day, and being projected to grow even more, our current infrastructure cannot keep up with and support drivers who need to rest between long periods of driving. Creating more parking spaces at rest areas, weigh stations, and other locations would allow drivers to feel safe and secure while resting, which will reduce the strain and stress they face daily. If this bill is enacted, it will allocate $755 million to the DOT to undertake the project and provide safe and free places to rest for drivers everywhere. 

Final Thoughts

The Truck Parking Bill is an important step in improving the working conditions for members of one of America’s largest industries. Keeping our drivers safe should be one of the main priorities in legislation, and now it is finally gaining ground. The fact that this bill is bipartisan truly shows how important it is and how little debate there should be over the fact that more must be done to help drivers perform at their very best. The Truck Parking Bill has the potential to do great things for drivers across the nation and set an example for constructing proper rest locations (and enough of them) for the rest of the world to follow. 

Sources:
https://bost.house.gov/media-center/press-releases/bost-bill-expand-truck-parking-would-make-roads-safer
https://www.thetruckersreport.com/truck-parking-bill-mean-755-million-new-free-truck-parking/
https://www.truckinginfo.com/352754/bipartisan-truck-parking-bill-introduced-in-house
https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/116/hr6104
https://landline.media/truck-parking-bill-receives-attention-at-house-hearing/ 

Returning to Pre-Pandemic Truckloads

A little over a year ago, the COVID-19 pandemic kicked into high gear, and we have seen huge changes in the lives and careers of almost everyone, not to mention the impacts of decreased contact on the economy. It has certainly been a unique time to live as the world has coped with a pandemic on a scale that hadn’t been seen in over a century, but thankfully, things are returning back to some semblance of normalcy. While everything is not exactly as it was, vaccinations, increased safety measures, and the ability to return to work is allowing us to heal and rise from the ashes of these unprecedented times.

Impacts of the Pandemic

COVID-19 has impacted almost every facet of life that we experience. On a personal scale, many people have lost jobs or adapted to virtual careers; on an economic scale, there was a crash followed by a resurgence as people found their feet again; and on a social scale, we have learned to be more cautious and wear masks to avoid spreading illness. 

While most of these impacts have been negative, good things have come out of the pandemic as well. We have learned to feel more connected despite the amount of physical distance and gained a strong sense of appreciation for those doing the society-preserving work of treating illness, stocking shelves, and transporting goods even when everything else stopped. 

Changing Times

Reopening transport systems and jobs has allowed for a resurgence in transportation. Samsara (a fleet management and productivity company) has reported that commercial driving has returned to 95% of its pre-pandemic volume. This return to full-scale transportation is a huge step in returning to normal, as it means that consumers are purchasing freight and helping build the economy back up. 

Truck drivers are crucial in this transition to high-volume transportation, and there is a need for dedicated and experienced drivers now more than ever. As a driver, you will likely experience the opportunity to haul freight more frequently than any time during 2020, and this will certainly benefit you and your family from a financial standpoint. However, it is important that you take time to ensure you are staying healthy and happy while on the road and at home as transitions to more high-volume work can be stressful. 

Returning to Normalcy

Building back up to 100% of the volume of pre-pandemic transportation is only the first step. As the Nation recovers from the debilitating effects of COVID-19, it is likely that there will be an even greater need for transportation. There are currently COVID-19 vaccinations being shipped throughout the nation, this is an entirely new need that truck drivers like you are likely to be able to help with.

We will be able to return to normal soon, and the opportunity to build beyond that is inspiring. The COVID-19 pandemic has been incredibly difficult, but we will rise and become better than ever before! In this hopeful time of regrowth and rebuilding, it is important to remember who helped us survive through the dark times of the pandemic, so we would like to thank all drivers who have worked to keep the economy open despite the challenges of this pandemic. You are truly heroes and we appreciate your continued efforts to keep the American Dream alive.

How to Stop Cargo Thieves in Their Tracks

how-to-stop-cargo-thieves

As a truck driver, cargo theft is one of the worst imaginable occurrences. The possibility of cargo theft keeps many drivers up and on high alert, which increases stress levels and decreases the amount of enjoyment one can get from their career. It is not a certainty that you can always stop cargo thieves from striking, but there are many ways to decrease their chances of stealing your valuable freight.

Criminal Activity

Cargo thieves, in some form or another, have been around for as long as people have needed to transport goods. From thieves lying in wait beside the roads in ancient Rome and pirates on the high seas to cattle rustlers and train robbers in the Wild West, thievery is a way of life for some people, and this carries over into our time as well. Unfortunately, criminals have gotten smarter in this era with the increase in global and nationwide communication and the ability to track the motions of the industry. Thieves are far more strategic in their schemes than ever before.

Thankfully, the industry and people working in it are getting smarter too. It is important that you educate yourself on ways to stop cargo thieves in their tracks. According to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NCIB), “Cargo Theft is a $15 to $35 billion problem.” This thievery takes a huge toll on individual businesses, as well as the larger US economy. As a driver, the safety of your cargo is one of the main priorities and you can help keep the economy and your business rolling by taking a few simple measures to ensure the safety of your freight.

Stranger Danger

Preventing cargo theft is possible. One of the most important things to remember on the road is to stay alert and watch for any suspicious people around your truck. Even if someone seems friendly, do not let them lure you away from your truck for any long period of time as there could be cargo thieves lurking nearby. This is one of the last measures you can take to prevent cargo theft, but there are many actions you can take to stop cargo thieves from even considering your freight.

Following the popular advice to never stop until you have already traveled 200-300 miles away from your pickup can save your freight, as most cargo thieves that tail trucks after their departure will likely not follow you beyond this distance. While driving it is also important to be aware of high-theft locations, which can be found with a quick online search. If possible, avoid these areas and try to drive until you reach a safer location. Choosing well lit populated places to stop at can help prevent cargo theft as well, as thieves are less likely to strike when witnesses are around.

In addition to prevention while driving, preventative hardware can aid in keeping your cargo safe. Installing alarms and locks on your truck, as well as cameras, can prevent thieves from stealing your freight. If they see these measures before they attempt to take anything, they may be dissuaded from trying to steal your cargo. Cameras and alarms can help alert you if there is suspicious activity  around your truck, so you can address the issue and alert the police if needed. Cameras may also aid in bringing the thieves to justice if they are not caught on the spot.

Prevention is the Best Medicine

The popular saying by many doctors, mechanics, and security workers is that prevention is the best medicine. This means that by taking measures to keep safe, you can save time and money. Keeping your cargo safe is incredibly important, and you have an important role to play in the prevention of thievery. Practicing these suggestions and tips while on the road, can make your transportation trips safer, happier, and far less stressful!

USDA Issues New Guidance For Hemp Transportation

USDA-Issues-New-Guidance-for-Hemp-Transportation

Truck drivers can’t seem to get a clear answer on whether or not  transporting hemp across state lines is legal? The U.S. Department of Agriculture has issued guidance on this topic, rather than a law. The USDA’s recent guidance states that nothing in the 2018 Farm Bill (the bill that hemp growers currently operate under) prohibits the interstate commerce of hemp. This is to say that truck drivers can indeed haul hemp for the purpose of interstate commerce.

The USDA, however, says that it lacks the authority to issue a true regulation that thoroughly protects truck drivers who haul hemp. What does that mean for you? Truck drivers should always have their paperwork, including the THC level test results for the hemp products they are hauling, with them in the event that they are pulled over and/or inspected.

Although the USDA supports the interstate transportation of legal hemp, it has yet to provide official shipping documents that could help truck drivers avoid being subject to detention by law enforcement when crossing state lines.

At this time, the USDA recommends that transporters carry a copy of the producer’s license or authorization, as well as any other information the governing state or Indian tribe recommends or requires that will validate that the transporter is transporting legally grown hemp, the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service said in a Jan. 19 Federal Register post. The USDA is not adding transportation paperwork requirements to this rule because it does not have jurisdiction over common carriers or other types of transporters.

Since the USDA is not providing the official paperwork, they suggest that truck drivers carry legal documentation before crossing state lines with hemp products. These can include:

  • U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency laboratory test result (or other THC content test results)
  • Contact information of the load’s buyer and seller
  • A copy of the hemp grower/producer’s license
  • An invoice or bill of lading

Though there is a lack of USDA documents for the transport of hemp, what is clear is that truck drivers can legally transport hemp as long as it is absent of high levels of THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol (the part that gets users high). Cannabis with a THC level exceeding 0.3% is considered marijuana, which remains classified as a Schedule I controlled substance regulated by DEA.

The interstate transport of hemp is legal, but, due to the lack of official documentation from the USDA (or the Department of Transportation,) there are still potential risks for truck drivers hauling hemp.

Since hemp is so similar looking and can even smell like THC-laden marijuana, it is understandable from law enforcement’s point of view why a load of hemp could be delayed or seized in order to test it for THC levels.

A law enforcement officer who pulls over a truck driver hauling hemp does not currently have a way to test for THC content like a lab does. That is why it is crucial to get ahead of any suspicion and carry all the paperwork you have access to in order to prove the legality of your load as we await further provisions from the USDA.

Health-share vs Traditional Health Insurance

traditional-health
Truck drivers have a statistically high risk job. The combination of sleep deprivation, long hours, and tight schedules means that truck drivers can be susceptible to accidents that, under normal driving conditions, might not happen. It’s a high stress job and working conditions are often hard on the body. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it is estimated that approximately 70% of truck drivers have at least one serious health condition. A preexisting condition, plus a high risk job, means that less health insurance companies will cover you. The companies that will cover you are also going to charge you more than the general public. On top of all of this, the average age of a truck driver is 55, which is an age where the body begins needing more medical attention than ever. In short, getting a good health insurance plan for truck drivers is not an easy task.

Faced with the prospect of being denied by health insurance providers, or paying hefty premiums, what can you do? What is the best health insurance option for truck drivers that want to keep it affordable? There are multiple options and we’ll walk you through them.

Do Truck Drivers Qualify For Medicaid?

It depends on how much you make. If you’re just starting out as a new truck driver and you make below $30,150, then Medicaid may be the best option for you. It just might not be the best long term option for you. The average truck driver’s salary is around $43,464 per year. With this being well over Medicaid’s salary cap, a career truck driver cannot depend on Medicaid for their health insurance needs. So, for most truck drivers, the ones who want to make a career out of driving,  Medicaid is not going to be a viable option.

What Other Health Insurance Options Are Out There That Are Affordable?

Truck drivers can take advantage of something called a health-share plan that can be an alternative to traditional health insurance. This can make driving a truck a more appealing career choice by making your healthcare more affordable. Essentially, a health-share plan works in the same way as a traditional plan would whenever you go to pay for healthcare. However, health-share plans are uniquely suited to the truck driving industry.

Your payments (or premiums) into a health-share plan are going to be lower than you would have to pay for traditional health insurance. Not only that, but your hard-earned money isn’t going to a faceless insurance company. Your premium goes toward helping other truck drivers when they need the money for their healthcare needs. Then, when you have a health care need, it’s your turn to take money out of the account.

Under the health-share system, your payments made into the plan are placed into an escrow account. When a healthcare need arises, your claim will be paid for through the funds available in the escrow account.

Finally, you can depend on health-share plans acting as most other insurance options. Health-share plans offer visits to the doctor, discounts on prescriptions, and preventative care programs.

FMCSA Announces Proposal to Amend the Vision Standard For Truck Drivers

fmcsa

A new proposal was announced in January 2021 suggesting a new vision standard for CDL (Commercial Drivers’ License) qualification. The alternative vision standard would make it easier for those with vision deficiencies to both retest for their CDL and receive a new CDL without seeking an exemption.

With the current vision standards set by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), those who do not meet the vision requirements to physically qualify for their CDL are sent through an exemption process that often takes months. The process, along with taking a good deal of time, also requires a substantial amount of paperwork. With the newly proposed standards, the time and paperwork required to qualify for the exemption will be a thing of the past. As a result, the barriers of entry in the trucking industry will be greatly reduced.

Currently, there are 2,566 truck drivers who hold an exemption for vision reasons with the FMCSA. Along with eliminating the exemption requirement for new CDL applicants, this new proposal will cover current truck drivers. So, those 2,566 drivers currently holding exemptions will no longer have to re-test and maintain their exemption status. Additionally, current drivers who may experience changes in vision will not have to seek exemption should their eyesight fall below the standard. This helps prevent interruptions in employment, as veteran drivers who test below the standard would be required to obtain their exemption status before returning to work.

This new vision standard is making big waves in the trucking industry for its obvious benefits:

  • Increases the pool of qualified applicants in this high-demand industry
  • Reduces hours of time previously qualified drivers spend unable to work
  • Alleviates pressure and overtime hours that overworked drivers currently face as a new pool of potential drivers becomes available

These benefits don’t come without their downsides and doubts though. Those who oppose or are cautious about the new FMCSA proposal cite safety as their main concern. Do we want to lower vision standards that may possibly put both truck drivers and civilians at great personal risk? Are the current overtime conditions more or less hazardous to the driver’s health? With studies that support the fact that overextension, lack of sleep, and repetitive visual habits can all contribute to vision loss or deficiency, an assumption can be made that vision loss and industry conditions are related?

The FMCSA is hearing questions like these and more from their announcement date in January through March 15th.

To view the proposal yourself, visit the following link:

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2021/01/12/2020-28848/qualifications-of-drivers-vision-standard

If you have thoughts about this and want to submit comments on the proposal, which is identified by docket number FMCSA-2019-0049, you can submit your thoughts through the following methods:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov
Fax: (202) 493-2251
Mail: Docket Operations, U.S. Department Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590-0001
Hand Delivery: Docket Operations, U.S> Department of Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590-0001, between 9 a.m. and 5p.m Monday through Friday except Federal holidays.

Must-have Apps for Drivers

must-have-apps-for-drivers

Cell phones and other mobile devices have quickly become one of the most helpful tools for truck drivers across the country.  There are apps that help drivers save money on fuel, food, and tolls; apps that save time with alternative routes to avoid traffic or bad weather; ones for communicating with loved ones or other drivers, entertainment, and better health.  Maps, chats, planning, and everything under the sun.  As they say, There’s an app for that!  

Here are just a few of the helpful apps available:

Driver Health Apps

Lose It―This free calorie-counter allows drivers to take control and eat healthier.  It allows users to set a goal and track their food intake so they can lose weight or maintain a healthy weight.  It has a database of thousands of foods, including fast-food restaurants.

Rolling Strong―This is a paid subscription app that is aimed at better health for drivers.  It focuses on nutrition, fitness, and sleep to help drivers in the program achieve better overall health. 

Entertainment and Communication

Skype―Being able to see your loved ones when you talk to them out on the road is much better than a phone call.  Skype allows you and your loved ones to easily connect with one person or your entire family to make life on the road feel less lonely.

Audiobooks.com―This app allows you to search their database of 150,000+ titles for audiobooks to listen to while you drive.  More than 8,000 are free and the app also lets you access more than 700,000 popular podcasts.

Time and Money Savers

Weigh My Truck―This app saves time by allowing you to weigh and pay while on the scale using your smartphone.  

Sygic Truck GPS Navigation & Maps―This popular navigation app is designed for drivers of large vehicles.  It has 3D offline maps, custom routing, traffic information, and more.

NOAA Radar―Real-time radar weather app with severe weather warnings so drivers can try to avoid bad weather that can slow them down. 

Gas Buddy―Developed in 2000, Gas Buddy was one of the first gas apps that relies on users to post gas prices around the country.  It allows users to filter by gas type so truck drivers can find the cheapest diesel near them.  

Direct Freight―Direct Freight’s load board app lets drivers search the extensive load database and filter loads that they wouldn’t want.  The easy-to-navigate app also allows drivers to post their truck.  It’s much more than a load board app and includes credit reports, reviews, and days-to-pay so drivers know exactly who they’re dealing with.  It also allows drivers to set alerts and has mapping and routing features as well as freight broker information.  

 Direct Freight is one of America’s leading load board services and now finding loads has never been easier than with their app.  To find out how Direct Freight can help you find the right loads and keep your trailer loaded go to DirectFreight.com today.   

Sources:  

https://www.loseit.com

https://rollingstrong.com

https://www.skype.com/en/

https://www.audiobooks.com/

https://catscale.com/cat-scale-apps/

https://www.sygic.com/truck

https://www.weather.gov/wrn/mobile-phone

https://www.gasbuddy.com

https://www.directfreight.com/home/#

 

    

 

Low Rates During the Coronavirus Pandemic Are Hurting Drivers

low-rates-during-coronavirus-pandemic-are-hurting-drivers

On May 1st, a convoy of more than 70 trucks gathered on Constitution Ave. in our nation’s capital to protest the low freight rates that are crippling an industry already damaged by the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Rates have fallen to unsustainable lows with truck load rates down from an average of $1.79 per mile in Feb. 2020, to an expected $1.51 in May.  The protesters aren’t asking for changes in the rates but rather, more transparency when it comes to freight brokers.  Drivers have the same overhead they had before the virus hit―truck payments, insurance premiums, fuel costs, repair bills, etc. It is all still there.  Despite the lowered rates, many freight brokers are charging the same commission as before so the protesters are asking for more government regulation.  The drivers are asking that Congress require brokers to provide transparent transaction records upon service completion and eliminate clauses that keep drivers from accessing them.  

There have been some ease of restrictions for drivers who are hauling freight that’s considered essential, the 14-hour limit has been waived so the restriction doesn’t prevent necessities from being delivered quickly, but it’s not enough.  With the closure of bars, restaurants, and many stores, freight isn’t moving like it was before the pandemic so there are fewer available loads and many carriers and drivers, especially smaller operations, are really struggling.  Drivers who can find loads are barely breaking even.  With the major hit to the number of loads, drivers are finding it more difficult to fill deadhead miles and are returning with empty trailers.    For others, it’s more profitable to park their trucks.  

Of course, those who do get loads are opening themselves up to getting the virus.  With so many drivers prone to obesity and who smoke, they may be at greater risk for developing severe symptoms or even dying from the disease. Many owner/operators have chosen to stay home over contracting the virus driving through hot spots in states where the virus is more prevalent.  

As we gain control over the virus and the country begins to open up again, there may be lasting damage to the trucking industry.  Even when demand grows in this country, much of the freight comes from overseas, leaving us dependent on the re-opening of other countries so recovery may be slow getting off the ground.  When it does, there’s a real fear that after businesses begin to reopen and the demand for drivers climbs that many drivers will simply not return.  

The protesters in Washington, D.C. are looking for fairness, that if load rates are less during this time, freight broker rates will be less too.  They aren’t looking for Congress to step in and do something about the declining rates because, even with all the punches this virus has inflicted on the trucking industry, there’s still the belief that with recovery of the American people, recovery in the economy, recovery of our nation, will come the recovery of the trucking industry.  

Direct Freight Services is a web-based load board that can make finding profitable loads easier.  It has many helpful features like full credit reports, load filtering, payment expectations, and broker authority information.  Whether accessed online or now through our easy-to-use Direct Freight app, Direct Freight helps you find the right loads. Go to DirectFreight.com and start searching for those high-quality loads today!    

Truck Drivers Are More Essential Than Ever

blog-image-template
One thing the coronavirus has made abundantly clear is that certain occupations simply cannot take a break because they are too vital to the people of this country to keep everything moving. Of these, doctors, nurses, and other workers in the health industry are the heroes fighting the enemy on the front line for those who have contracted the virus. Then there are those who are keeping the shelves stocked so we have food and other necessities to keep the rest of the country going during the crisis. We’re grateful for all of them.

However, there’s one group of workers behind the curtain that make all of that possible, those who supply food for the shelves and medical supplies for hospitals―truck drivers.

Truck drivers truly are the backbone of our country and without them, everything would grind to a halt. Throughout the pandemic, drivers are putting in long hours and facing possible exposure to the virus, all so essential workers can do their essential work.   Our entire infrastructure relies on them.

Difficulties on the Road

Life on the road in the shadow of the coronavirus has become more complicated for drivers.  Essential freight is still moving so for drivers hauling food and hospital supplies, work is plentiful. But with the construction industry coming to a halt, and stores and small businesses deemed non-essential shuttering their doors, drivers who haul goods to these businesses are struggling.

For drivers still out on the road, dine-in restaurants at truck stops have closed, leaving weary drivers with no place to relax and recharge outside of their truck.  Some have been able to leave their showers and laundry services open for drivers. Some have closed altogether. With fast-food restaurants closing their dining rooms, drivers have had to adjust their eating habits. Trucks don’t fit through the drive-thru lanes and if they park and walk up to the window, some refuse to serve them. Palmdale Sheriff’s office tweeted:  If you happen to be sitting in your car eating because the dining room is closed, & see a truck driver attempt to pull on a door, please ask if you can buy them a meal. Most places do not allow walk ups, and their rigs usually don’t fit. We owe them that much!

Because meals are unpredictable, more drivers are now bringing their own food on the road and preparing it with their own microwaves, cookers, and coffee makers.

Relief May Be On the Way

A proposal by Senate Democrats for a COVID- 19 Heroes Fund would provide eligible front line workers up to $25,000 in hazard pay for those deemed essential during the crisis such as medical workers, truck drivers, grocers, transit workers, and essential federal employees. While still in its early stages, this proposal speaks for many who believe something needs to be done for the dedicated workers who put themselves in harm’s way every day.  In the meantime, we wait for the curve to flatten.

Through this crisis and the economic recovery when it follows, drivers are unsung heroes.  So when people talk of the heroic front line, remember where their supplies are coming from.  And the next time you reach for a new roll of toilet paper, thank a truck driver!

Direct Freight Services is an essential tool for shippers, freight brokers, and carriers that allows users to post or find trucks and includes many features that will help move freight smoothly and efficiently.  Go to DirectFreight.com today to find out more.

Sources:

https://www.democrats.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Heroes%20Fund%20FINAL%204.7.20.pdf