Category: business

What is the economic impact of the trucking industry in the United States?

The United States has one of the strongest economies in the world and much of its rigor is powered by its incredible logistical network that allows goods to be transported across the nation rapidly and efficiently. After the creation of the interstate system in the 40s and 50s, the trucking industry took hold on the nation by creating thousands of jobs and providing the means for reliable transportation. The United States economy depends on the stability and dependability of its transportation system.

Money Talk

Money is on everyone’s mind. It is even more salient to economists who have analyzed the United States economy. With a quick look at the statistics, one can see that trucking is big. It takes up over 70% of the transportation industry, and recently, yearly revenue has exceeded $800 billion through completed deliveries. That’s over 11.5 billion tons of cargo each year, according to TheTrucker.com. Beyond the direct economic impact lies the impact of stores and distributors selling the goods that were transported. CFS reports that as of 2017, 71.6% of goods in the United States were transported on a truck before reaching their points of civilian distribution.

Impactful Industry

The trucking industry touches many different aspects of American life, from groceries, pharmaceuticals, household goods, to cars and building materials. America truly runs on trucking. The economic impacts of trucking are also able to be quantified in terms of employment. Trucking is a great career for many people, and there are drivers on the road today from nearly every walk of life. Trucking used to be a career predominately reserved for men, but now anybody can have a successful career driving!

In fact, there are around 3.36 million drivers on the road in the United States today, of this number, about 6% are female drivers, but this number is increasing yearly! Additionally, nearly 10% of drivers are veterans who have found fulfilling careers after serving the United States in the Military. Professional drivers make on average over $60,000 per year, which is nearly twice the national average income according to Census estimates. This access to a lucrative career is great for the economy because it means drivers are self-sufficient and able to purchase and invest in what they need.

Run the World

The transportation industry is one of the driving forces of the global economy. The presence of an interconnected network of supply, demand, and transit allows a free flow of capital that can instill economic growth. Trucking is a major part of this network, especially in larger nations like the United States. As we continue in time, it is expected there will be more need for drivers as the trucking industry is expected to grow. The zenith of the economic impact of trucking is yet to be seen.

Final Thoughts

Drivers are the lifeblood of the United States and its economic power. The incredible logistical system that allows goods to be transported from pickup to drop-off is part of what makes the United States such a wonderful place to live, and drivers are the most important piece of the economic puzzle. The economy is still recovering after the pandemic, but it is already looking like it will reach even greater heights than before and drivers will be crucial in building it up!

History of the Trucking Industry Within the United States

Since the semi-truck was invented in 1898 by Alexander Winton, the American Trucking Industry has rolled on and been driven to incredible heights becoming one of the largest and most important industries in the United States. American Trucking has survived dark times, always lighting the way to a better and brighter future for the industry and for America as a whole. The story of the trucking industry is one of perseverance, triumph, and improvement, and this spirit persists to the present.

Trucking Through Time

The Beginning

We have already discussed the history of the semi-truck in a previous post that you can check out here, but the story of the industry built around the machine is equally as interesting. The first commercial semi-truck was built as an answer to the increased need for the transportation of goods across the country. The first major use of trucks was by the military in World War 1, though after the war, the increase of paved roads across the country made it possible for the industry to take hold for civilian purposes in the 1930s. Once the industry was well established, it became subject to regulations as it and other occupations began to grow and expand. 

Growth and Expansion

20 years later the interstate system in the United States was created, allowing for easier and faster national transport of goods. This allowed for major expansion and improvement of the trucking industry, making it more reliable and efficient. The advancement of temperature-controlled trucking, first invented in 1925, but improved upon greatly in the 40s and 50s allowed for the safe delivery of pharmaceuticals and food products as well.

Music and Protest

In the 1960s and 1970s the American Trucking industry became more prevalent in the public eye with many songs being written about it while gaining incredible popularity. There was something about the subject matter of trucking songs, the long coast to coast drives, traveling through wide open spaces, and the struggles that drivers faced that greatly touched the American public. During the early 70s, the trucking industry took a major hit when the energy crises of 1973 and 1979 incited protests and strikes by many drivers who were upset by rising fuel prices. 

Dysregulation and Further Growth

In 1980 the Motor Carrier Act was passed by President Carter. The Act decreased the governmental regulations on the industry which allowed owners of fleets and individual drivers more liberty in the management of their business. President Carter said this about the act: “This is historic legislation. It will remove 45 years of excessive and inflationary Government restrictions and red tape. It will have a powerful anti-inflationary effect, reducing consumer costs by as much as $8 billion each year. And by ending wasteful practices, it will conserve annually hundreds of millions of gallons of precious fuel. All the citizens of our Nation will benefit from this legislation.”

Now and the Future

The trucking industry has come to dominate the United States transportation industry, replacing the horses and carriages of the previous centuries, long lines of trains, and even exceeding air transport in volume and efficiency. Now the trucking industry is entering a new era with the rest of the digital age. There are now online blogs about trucking, websites and magazines that allow drivers to communicate with their peers across the world (like you’re doing right now), and the rise of electric trucks and self-driving vehicles. The trucking industry is still growing and changing, and its future is incredibly bright! 

How To Build a Successful Trucking Career for Military Veterans

Trucking, America’s second greatest career, can be just right for Veterans of America’s greatest career, the Military. Firstly, thank you for your service Veterans! Life after coming home from the military can be really challenging as the civilian world works on an entirely different time frame with  entirely different stakes. There is an adjustment period you will face, or have faced, when coming back to civilian life and this has the potential to cause a lot of stress for you and your family. With that, we wish you the best of luck and strongly encourage taking care of yourself and seeking help where it is needed!

America’s Greatest Drivers

 

As you face the world newly relieved from your service, you will likely start to realize that working a civilian job feels different, or even impossible, after being in the armed forces. That’s perfectly reasonable and sometimes you just need an adjustment. Starting a career in driving may be the adjustment needed as it provides you the opportunity to travel, clear your mind, and stay busy! While it seems that your retirement from the military would be one with no more work, it turns out retirement can be boring and finding a productive way to spend your time often helps to keep you feeling in tip top shape!

Driving can be a great career choice, but you do need to be aware of what you’re signing up for as you begin preparing for a new working environment. If traveling long distances on open roads, or local highways, delivering goods to all sorts of people seems like an awesome job description, we encourage you to check out driving. However, if you are looking for something that allows you more family time, long-haul driving may not be the choice for you. Regional driving jobs often have regular hours where you can return home each evening though, so driving may not be entirely out of the picture! 

Service in a Different Realm

 

Driving and delivering goods is likely different compared to what you were doing in the military, but it can be fulfilling all the same. While your service is done defending America from threats, driving can help you serve the country in a different way. The transportation industry is one of America’s largest as production and selling of goods is only as marketable as distribution allows. So, how do you get into the industry?

Thankfully, it’s easier than ever to get started driving as there is a major driver deficit facing the country. Many driving companies are offering free CDL classes if you will work for them for a set amount of time. You can find these positions with a quick job search online, but make sure to use discretion to find reliable agencies. Check their reviews and the Better Business Bureau to make sure they are a good fit for you. In addition to training, many driving positions are offering a great sign-on bonus for the reasons previously stated. As soon as you go through a CDL course and understand the rules of the road, you will be ready to launch into driving!

Building Up

 

Entering the trucking industry is quite easy these days, and trucking agencies love Veterans because they appreciate your service and understand how difficult it can be to start your career outside of the military! Many agencies offer special Veteran programs, so keep a lookout for those as you research trucking as a career path! We wish you the best of luck in getting started with your career and civilian life. Thank you so very much for your service!

Safety Behind the Wheel

When you sign up for a career in trucking, most of your journeys will be behind the wheel. For most drivers this is the best place in the world to be, but as you continue in your career, you will learn the dangers of living behind the wheel. From natural hazards like snow, ice, wildlife, and wind, to dangerous drivers, poorly marked signage, and fatigue, there are many obstacles a driver may face on his journey from pickup to delivery. It is up to the driver to understand how to face them.

Highways and Byways

America’s road system is incredibly vast. There are 4.18 million miles of roads (artba.org/) and over 164,000 miles of those 4.18 million are highways (dot.gov). This is a massive expanse and there are drivers on all parts of these highways all the time because transport is a necessarily huge industry. As a long-haul driver, you will likely encounter many of these miles. There are many factors to keep track of to ensure you are staying safe that local drivers are usually less concerned with including, driver fatigue, loss of cell service in case of emergency, and truck theft hotspots. 

As a local driver who stays in a regional area, you will most likely avoid predatory truck thieves, but you will become well acquainted with driving in crowded areas. Many regional drivers spend much of their time traveling on roads within towns and cities, and these tend to get busy especially around mealtimes. In addition to this, regional drivers are more subject to needing to watch out for events, detours, and pedestrians, as these are all more probable obstacles on main streets than the interstate. 

The Path You Choose

Whether you choose the local or long-haul route, driving can be a fulfilling career with the benefit of getting to know the nation or your local area better. However, safety behind the wheel is the most important thing to consider as you embark on your next journey. Here is a quick pneumonic tool to help you remember important safety tips and tricks for all modes of driving: SAFE, Start your journey with a truck inspection, Ask questions when you are unsure, Follow all speed and safety regulations, Expect that something may go wrong and have a plan to adapt. 

While remaining vigilant and following safety regulations is hopefully intuitive, the other concepts may be new to you. Starting your trip off on the right foot is quite simple, making sure you got enough sleep and have the right supplies in your truck can be a great first step. Before you embark on your next journey, you should check up on your truck by performing a quick inspection on the tires, brakes, fluid levels, lights, and doors/locks, which can save your truck and even your life (or someone else’s).

Now for asking questions and expecting something to go wrong, these two go hand in hand. If you are ever unsure about something regarding your route or your truck, asking questions about it can always be a great place to start. As you are creating a game plan for if something goes wrong with your truck or you face a road hazard, ask questions to your company or more experienced drivers who will gladly give you safety tips!

Final Thoughts

As you go about getting ready for your next journey, reflect on your current safety practices to see what’s good and functional and try to remediate what may be unsafe. Having a safe drive will expedite your trip, ensure you are less stressed, and keep the American transport and highway system running smoothly. Thank you for your service!

Winter Weather Driving Tips

Winter seems to come too quickly. It’s a beautiful season filled with opportunities to see the family, eat great food, and celebrate the holiday season, but winter is also one of the most dangerous seasons as there are all the usual hazards coupled with ice and snow. As the days continue to get colder, it is crucial that you are prepared for the challenges of winter, in both your home and work life as driving in near-freezing temperatures and potentially inclement weather can be hazardous.

Driving in Severe Weather

Considering the problems that can occur while driving is the first step to building safe winter driving habits. The first thing to take into account when you are planning on taking your next route is to make sure you are familiar with the weather in all locations you will be driving through. Some places will be warmer or colder than others, and it is crucial that you know which locations will have hazardous conditions such as snowstorms, icy roads, or freezing rain. Being familiar with the challenges you will face on the journey and continuing to check the news (or a dependable weather app) will help you be prepared. 

The most important thing to know when driving in potentially icy locations is that going slowly can save lives. Speed is very highly valued in the trucking industry, and it can be very hard to choose to slow down especially when most drivers are in a time crunch. However, in hazardous conditions, the most responsible thing to do is slow down to a comfortable and safe speed, being sure to follow any emergency directives from road signs even if this results in a delayed arrival. 

In addition to this primary guideline, you should also complete pre-travel checks of your truck to ensure it is well-equipped and functioning correctly for the trip. Other important tips for safe driving in any season, but especially the winter, include following traffic at a safe distance, staying to the right, checking your brakes often and keeping them clear of winter slush overnight, avoiding distractions, and making sure your headlights are clear. While you are driving, do your best to avoid panicking, even when you face scary situations. Staying calm and using common sense will help you through even the worst problems. You can always pull off the road and call for assistance if you believe the conditions are too unsafe to continue.

Stay Safe, Stay Warm

Icy conditions wreak havoc on the plans of drivers (both commercial and civilian) all through the winter season. While there are hazards on the road all year round, from animals and natural dangers, winter takes the cake as the most dangerous season of the year because it combines all the risks with ice and snow. However, many incidents are easily avoided by using common sense and making sure to follow the guidelines of going slowly when necessary and taking steps to ensure you are staying alert, aware, and prepared for any challenge winter throws at you. 

Supply chain crunch. Why are ports overwhelmed?

Ports are overwhelmed across the nation and entire international sphere. This is not an entirely new problem, but it has been exacerbated as time progressed. There are many factors that have contributed to the current supply chain crisis and these have built up over the past 40 years. In the media, there is an ample amount of news about broken infrastructure, inefficient shipping situations, and various crises around the world involving transportation like the Suez Canal incident earlier this year. The entire canal was blocked by a grounded container ship having long lasting consequences on the transportation network.   

Port Problems

Transportation faces challenges in all sectors, ground, sea, and sky.The most notable challenge facing transportation right now is highly congested ports. There are an incredible number of ports across the globe, but only a handful are high volume ports.These are backing up more and more. This has led to many shipping companies calling smaller ports for assistance and, while they are glad to see the business, they are also unable to accommodate most shipments as there is a chronic shortage of chassis facing the port shipping industry. Chassis are load-bearing trailer frames designed to attach to a truck and carry shipping containers. 

Many ports do not own their own chassis and rely on the receiving agency to supply their own, which poses an issue since the port cannot accept containers with no way to be transported once they are on land. Even ports that have huge yards filled with chassis are unable to use them most of the time because large companies tend to hold onto them even when not in use. In addition to this, there is a shortage of drivers available to transport the shipping containers even if there are enough chassis present.

Supply Chain Difficulty

The greatest difficulty facing ports is not one related to the ships carrying goods across the ocean, but rather the reception of the goods on land. The larger ports are experiencing a piling up of shipping containers and many have plans for expansion, but expanding can only do so much for the ports in question as space is limited. The problem can only be solved by an increase in ground transport from the ports. This ground transport can be in the form of trains and trucks. Trains are seeing a rise in popularity, but an increase of chassis and drivers willing to take on transport jobs from the ports are likely the only ways for ports to see a decrease in congestion.

A lack of drivers is something facing not just ports, but the entire domestic transport system. Presently the driver shortage is due to many factors including, but not limited to, drivers retiring, COVID-19, low pay, and difficult working conditions. Some of these factors can be remediated by boosting the popularity of driving and showing future drivers that it can be a great career option. In addition to this, increasing driver pay and ensuring that working conditions are fair and safe will ensure that more drivers are willing and able to participate in transporting goods across America. 

What About the Future?

The supply chain crisis poses a real and present danger to the infrastructure of many global economies and businesses as they rely on timely and efficient deliveries. There are steps that can and should be taken in order to fix this issue. Expanding ports, increasing driver employment, and sharing chassis more effectively could help to slowly heal the infrastructure. In effect, the transportation process would be expedited and the movement of goods would continue to flow unhindered.

Social Media and Trucking

Social media is the way most people are communicating today. From crazy comic strips and cookie recipes to important information and ideas, the social media sphere has pretty much anything you could think of. Sometimes filtering through the vastness of it can be a daunting task, but finding your community online can be a great experience. The good news is there are plenty of online trucking communities for people across the industry, in a variety of different driving and fleet management occupations, who are ready to connect and share their advice, stories, and companionship.

Not Your Mama’s Communication Method

Social media is not just for teenagers anymore. There are plenty of business professionals, community organizations, corporations, and celebrities that use social media in a variety of ways. Social media can be used for entertainment, connectivity, and information gathering. Instead of calling people or writing to them, every now and then, these platforms make it possible for you to communicate with friends and loved ones across the globe freely and instantly.

This also applies to finding a community of strangers who all share commonalities. Many online groups are built based on each member living in a specific location, having similar life experiences, working the same job, or any number of common points that people may share. You can gain insight from talking to people in these groups, which can be beneficial in making connections and networking. Be sure to practice safety while online as the internet can be a dangerous place, never share your personal information with people you don’t fully trust.

High Tech

You can reach a social media platform just as easily as any other website on the internet.. There is plenty of information available to help you navigate these platforms for the first time. Another great thing about social media is that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of different places you can connect with people. The most popular sources of social media are Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, but there are many social media platforms that have been created just for a specific group of people.

Remote communication can help keep you and your associates safe, so now is a great time to explore all the different options in the world of social media. If you have a computer or smartphone, you are just one step away from connecting with others. It is truly incredible the speed and efficacy in which you can communicate with your community. 

Final Thoughts

Living and working in the 21st century can be stressful at times.Things seem to go at light speed, but it is also amazing to live in an age with modern healthcare and instant communication. There are many technologies that can make life easier and help you build meaningful connections with people across the globe, and they are only a few clicks away for the most part. Check out different social media platforms, explore, and join ones that suit your needs and wants to stay connected, updated, and informed.

All About the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

Regulation, regulation, regulation- the government is very good at you guessed it, regulation. Sometimes the laws and rules around driving and the trucking industry or even the economy seem tedious and invasive, but governmental regulation can be a very good thing for the safety and prosperity of everyone in the nation. Following guidelines and keeping equipment up to date to the standards of governmental authority can sometimes seem like too much to keep track of but being sure to stay within the rules is a great way to stay safe and free of expensive fines and limitations.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is a governmental authority that plays a major role in regulating the national motor transport industry from long-haul to regional trucking and everything in between. The goal of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is to “keep our nation’s roadways safe and improve commercial motor vehicle safety through regulation, education, enforcement, research, and technology.”

A History of Transport

The United States has had a long history of transporting goods, even before the nation was founded, farmers, trappers, and traders carried goods across the continent for trading purposes. After the days of horses and buggies, railroads and steamships came into the limelight as a great way to expediently transport goods across the nation, and even across the world. While cargo ships and railways are still used to transport goods daily, the American Trucking Industry is the primary means of transport for domestic cargo.

The first modern type of tractor trailer was built and used in 1914 to transport a boat- ever since then, 18-wheelers have taken over the roads as the most efficient form of transport over land. With the ability to move huge amounts of goods faster than any other terrestrial vehicle, it’s a no-brainer that trucks became so popular. The increase in trucks prompted the need for regulation- for a while, the industry was in a wild west stage with little regulation and little safety but creating guidelines for those in the industry whether it be drivers, engineers, or managers helped in forming the trucking industry of today! 

A Useful Resource

The FMCSA is not only a regulating and enforcing agency, but also a useful research and educational base for drivers and managers. The FMCSA website is filled with articles about how to improve your driving or managing experience, and it also has news about the latest technology and how it impacts the industry. One of the most important tabs on the entire website is the safety tab- it contains information on keeping yourself and others safe from all the risks that occur with the industry.

The FMCSA also serves as a database for statistics, information, and driver data. Managers can use FMCSA Licensing and Insurance public record to ensure that they are hiring legitimate drivers which is important for keeping their business, other drivers, and the public safe. The FMCSA serves as a useful hub for everyone in the industry, allowing them to stay current and informed.

Final Thoughts

The FMCSA is a great resource for everyone in the industry, giving the latest news on technology, statistics, and regulations. There are many resources on the FMCSA website for making your routes safer, happier, and healthier through articles, rules, and press releases about current issues in the industry. It’s an awesome idea to check out the FMCSA website (linked here) to explore the regulation side of the industry!

Must-have Apps for Drivers

must-have-apps-for-drivers

Cell phones and other mobile devices have quickly become one of the most helpful tools for truck drivers across the country.  There are apps that help drivers save money on fuel, food, and tolls; apps that save time with alternative routes to avoid traffic or bad weather; ones for communicating with loved ones or other drivers, entertainment, and better health.  Maps, chats, planning, and everything under the sun.  As they say, There’s an app for that!  

Here are just a few of the helpful apps available:

Driver Health Apps

Lose It―This free calorie-counter allows drivers to take control and eat healthier.  It allows users to set a goal and track their food intake so they can lose weight or maintain a healthy weight.  It has a database of thousands of foods, including fast-food restaurants.

Rolling Strong―This is a paid subscription app that is aimed at better health for drivers.  It focuses on nutrition, fitness, and sleep to help drivers in the program achieve better overall health. 

Entertainment and Communication

Skype―Being able to see your loved ones when you talk to them out on the road is much better than a phone call.  Skype allows you and your loved ones to easily connect with one person or your entire family to make life on the road feel less lonely.

Audiobooks.com―This app allows you to search their database of 150,000+ titles for audiobooks to listen to while you drive.  More than 8,000 are free and the app also lets you access more than 700,000 popular podcasts.

Time and Money Savers

Weigh My Truck―This app saves time by allowing you to weigh and pay while on the scale using your smartphone.  

Sygic Truck GPS Navigation & Maps―This popular navigation app is designed for drivers of large vehicles.  It has 3D offline maps, custom routing, traffic information, and more.

NOAA Radar―Real-time radar weather app with severe weather warnings so drivers can try to avoid bad weather that can slow them down. 

Gas Buddy―Developed in 2000, Gas Buddy was one of the first gas apps that relies on users to post gas prices around the country.  It allows users to filter by gas type so truck drivers can find the cheapest diesel near them.  

Direct Freight―Direct Freight’s load board app lets drivers search the extensive load database and filter loads that they wouldn’t want.  The easy-to-navigate app also allows drivers to post their truck.  It’s much more than a load board app and includes credit reports, reviews, and days-to-pay so drivers know exactly who they’re dealing with.  It also allows drivers to set alerts and has mapping and routing features as well as freight broker information.  

 Direct Freight is one of America’s leading load board services and now finding loads has never been easier than with their app.  To find out how Direct Freight can help you find the right loads and keep your trailer loaded go to DirectFreight.com today.   

Sources:  

https://www.loseit.com

https://rollingstrong.com

https://www.skype.com/en/

https://www.audiobooks.com/

https://catscale.com/cat-scale-apps/

https://www.sygic.com/truck

https://www.weather.gov/wrn/mobile-phone

https://www.gasbuddy.com

https://www.directfreight.com/home/#

 

    

 

Steps to Become an Owner/Operator

steps-to-become-an-owner-operator

To buy a truck or work for a carrier as part of their fleet is an essential question most truck drivers ask themselves at some point in their careers.  Both options have pros and cons and either choice could be a good career choice.

Advantages to Working For a Carrier:

  • The truck belongs to the carrier, and associated costs and maintenance are their responsibility.
  • Benefits like group health insurance and paid vacation time.
  • There’s less financial risk.
  • Less worry.  Your job ends when you’re done driving.
  • No overhead.  The money you earn is the money you get.  No need to pay for repairs, maintenance, etc.
  • It’s easier to quit your job to find a more suitable company.
  • No start-up costs other than your CDL.  Just get in the truck and go. 

Advantages of Becoming an Owner/operator:

  • More flexible schedule.
  • While it’s not always the case, there is a potential to earn more money.
  • Built-up equity in your truck.
  • Not sharing a truck with other drivers.  Some companies do this and you may be left cleaning up after someone else.
  • You’re your own boss.
  • There could be tax advantages.
  • The truck is customized to your liking.
  • More choice of loads.

 There is no right answer to the question, only what is right for you.  Do you want to be your own boss with all of the responsibilities that go along with it or do you prefer the security of working for someone else?  

Becoming an Owner/Operator

Before taking the steps to become an owner/operator, take the time to examine the pros and cons of each.  It’s a huge financial step.  There’s nothing wrong with spending your career working for someone else.  Once you’re sure you want your own truck, you can begin taking steps to make it happen.

Obtain your CDL.  You need that for the operator part of becoming an Owner/Operator.  Some people pay for their CDL by taking advantage of programs that some carriers have where they pay for your CDL as long as you agree to work for them for a specified time period.  If you do this, you’ll have to meet those obligations before becoming your own boss. 

Get Money.  Any business needs start-up money and yours will mainly be for buying a truck.  If you don’t have the money, you can take out a loan or lease a truck.  

Get Licensed and Registered.  If you plan to operate as an interstate (across state lines) carrier you will need a USDOT number to transport cargo.  You can obtain  a USDOT number by registering online through the Unified Registration Program on FMCSA’s (Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration) website.  You most likely will also be required to have an MC number which is your authority to operate, also found at FMCSA. There is a one-time filing fee of $300.  Depending on the weight of your truck, you may be responsible for paying the Heavy Vehicle Use Tax.  More details can be found here.   

Get Insured.  The FMCSA not only requires insurance, but it also requires different types of insurance depending on your load, i.e. hazardous, etc.  Of course, if you are planning on hauling hazardous materials, you must obtain a special endorsement for your CDL too.

Find Loads.  Once you’re legitimate and ready to roll, how do you get loads?  A good load board can help you find lucrative loads that will help your business get off the ground.  You can search by type of load and region, and because you’re in it to make money and not drive around an empty trailer, load boards can help you fill those deadhead miles to maximize your profits.  

Becoming an owner/operator isn’t for everybody.  It’s definitely something that you have to be in it for the long haul, so to speak.  If you have what it takes, owning and operating your own truck can be a profitable and rewarding career choice.  

If you’ve decided to become an owner/operator, Direct Freight Services is the only load board you’ll need.   Direct Freight is a full-service load board that allows truckers to find loads and companies to post their available loads. The Direct Freight website also has many useful features such as a mobile app, credit reports and scores, mile calculators, fuel price data, weather conditions, turn-by-turn truck-specific routing, and more.  To see everything Direct Freight has to offer Owner/Operators, go to DirectFreight.com today!

Sources:

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/get-mc-number-authority-operate

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/hvut/mod1/whatishvut.cfm